1968 Penny Value: D, Error List, and No Mint Mark

1968 Penny Value - Are you interested in antique coins? Want to collect old coins such as dollar penny, silver penny, Wheat ear penny, or Lincoln dollar penny? Or you might want to sell the old coins you have at the best price? Then you have come to the right place. If you have a 1960s Lincoln penny and want to know more about it, Here we gave you the 1968 penny value, d error list, and worth for the current market. 

During the 1960s and 1970s, the United States of America released a series of a new penny to replace the older penny. 

This new penny series was called as Lincoln memorial 1960 dollar penny. It is designed to replace the earlier design of the Wheat ear penny in circulation. 

Even though its initial value is just a penny or $0.01, the 1960s and 1968 penny value has risen and could be worth much more than that.

For those who are unfamiliar with old coins, and antique selling, the value of a coin isn’t just its initial value. 

When the coin has been around for decades old, the value of its coin has risen, due to sometimes rarity, inflation of metal used in the coins, collectibles, rare errors, and many more. The 1968 Lincoln penny value also varied, depending on its grade, and category.

This time, we will explain to you all about the grading of the 1960s Lincoln Dollar penny, how much it’s valued in the market, and how precious it is compared with other collections of old coins. 

Even though the 1960s penny isn’t a rare coin at all, and the initial value is just a penny, some of them might be worth more than that, and even could net you a huge sum of money, when the grading is incredibly high.

1968 Lincoln Memorial Penny Specifications


Before knowing the worth and 1968 penny value in the current antique market, we need to know first about the Lincoln penny itself, the specifications, the design, and its composition. 

1968 penny value error


1968 Penny Specifications:
• Type: Lincoln Penny coins
• Year minted: 1960s to 1970s
• Face Initial Value: 0.01 Dollar
• Composition: Bronze (95% copper and 5% Tin), some of the special coins of this penny are also made of silver and steel
• Total Weight of each coin: 3.11 g
The 1968 penny value mostly comes from the composition of its coin. The 1960 coin was mostly made from the Bronze, a material composed of 95% of copper. 

What makes the value increase, and surpass its initial value, are the materials themselves. The prices of the 1968 penny value are based on the weight of its metal composition, and the inflated price of its metal. 

Of course, other factors are also factored in such as the grading, the conditions of the coin, errors in the mintage, and so on. 

So, how the penny is graded? Why it has different grades, and what makes them different?

How Much Are 1968 Penny Value And Grading?


There are three categories of the 1960s Lincoln penny, the 1960s Lincoln memorial pennies, the 1960 D Lincoln penny, and the proof coin Lincoln penny. 

These pennies have different prices, and different minted quantities, but all of the mas pretty much the same design. The three categories sometimes also determine the 1968 penny value in the market.

The first type is the 1998 d Lincoln penny, it was minted in Denver, with the amount of around 13,450,260 in the year 1968. 1968 d penny value is a bit lower than the other minted and marked penny of the 1960s. 

With the standard grade or lower grade of coins, the 1968 D penny will value around $2 to $5 at best. However, the clean specimens or error coins might be worth around $140.

The 1968 S-type Lincoln penny was minted in Philadelphia, with the total quantity of minted 1968 Lincoln penny around 7,450280. The 1968 s penny value is slightly better compared with the d penny, minted and marked in Denver. 

The usual price for these specimens is around $4 to $6, not much it is still a penny after all. However, the high grade and error mark that you should be looking for.

1968 Lincoln Penny Error List You Might Want To Hunt For


Some very rare pennies have shown signs of an error on their mintage. For example, the error such as double die, or no mint mark shown on the Lincoln penny. 

This 1968 penny value error most likely came from outside damage and exposure to the air, and very rarely it is an error and mistake from the mintage. 

If there is an error from Mintage, it could be worth more than it is. The error of mintage indicates that the coin itself is a very rare alteration of the already old coins, therefore boosting its current value, and bloating its price. 

The error varies, from the common such as breaking of dying to the rare double die, or no mint mark error.   
       
If you are looking to hunt an error Lincoln penny, you might want to hunt for certain errors that are worth the money. 

Some errors might be worth you a good amount of money, while other wills just going to decrease the value of such coins. 

Here is some error on coins that you might see on the Lincoln penny. 

• 1968 Double Die Penny – The double die error is a mintage error that the coin seems to have doubled on its double died, and has pre-punched double. This error is pretty rare; therefore these specimens might have been worth quite a sum of money. The 1968 S DDO penny value could at least increase its value by $50 to $150. 

• 1968 No mint mark error – The 1968 penny value no mint mark increases around $45 to $50. It is no mint mark, the error from mintage. The value of the 1968 penny no mint mark value can increase along with the grading and conditions, but the chance of finding it is incredibly rare. 

• 1968 Breaking die penny – 1968 could have broken die; the area of surface broke down and cracked. This is mostly due to the outside exposure. Since it is an exposure error, it isn’t worth much and can increase the value much more.

These are the error pennies that you might want to keep or collect. If you want to expand your collections for error pennies, many errors are worth to be kept, rather than selling them. 

If you want to sell error pennies, try to reach out to the coin collectors community that wants to get their hand on error penny, or you can look for the buyers online. 

Frequently Asked Questions Regarding about 1968 Penny 

These are the most frequently asked questions regarding the 1968 penny, from how much you can get from selling a 1968 penny, how it was graded, and where you can find buyers for the old 1968 pennies.

How much you can get from selling the 1968 Lincoln penny? – When we are talking about the 1968 penny value, many things can be factored with. The grading of the coins, the category of each coin, the conditions, the scarcity of that coins, and if there are errors in the 1968 coin. The type of coins can also affect the amount of money you can get.

The 1968 s Lincoln penny would value more since it was marked and minted in Philadelphia with a more limited amount than the 1968 D penny error or the proof penny. The composition of the coins is also affecting the value you can get.

How the 1968 Penny is graded? – To determine the 1968 penny value first you will need to grade it. You need to go to coin grading and have your coins graded by the experts. When grading old coins, there are many things to factor in too, from the conditions of the coins, how well preserved it was, the errors in coins, and the demands for the metal composition on the penny. 

For example, there are two grading systems for 1968, the MS-63RB and also MS-65RD. The MS-63RB is a grade that has slight blemishes, and also some contact marks, so the luster and shine of the coin might not be prominent. The color of this grade is red-brown, reddish due to the coloration of aging Bronze.

However, the MS-65RD has strong luster and shine, making it appealing to the eye. It is an uncirculated gem and has light contact marks. The color is full-red due to the oxidation of Bronze taking place older than the reddish-brown specimens.

Where to find buyers for your old 1968 coins? – Some many buyers and collectors want to get their hand on the luster MS-65RD series, and higher grades. However, if it is just a lower grade, you might not get much value from it.



These are a summary of information regarding the 1960s Lincoln penny, and how much you will get from the 1968 penny value today. The 1968 Lincoln memorial penny is a pretty common coin, and most of them won’t net for a quiet value. However, the high-grade pennies could be worth so much more, especially the high-grade MS-65RD.

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